04.06.2018: "Postcolonial Theory and Ethnomusicology: Ambivalence and Mimicry, from Discourse to Performance"

04.06.2018: "Postcolonial Theory and Ethnomusicology: Ambivalence and Mimicry, from Discourse to Performance"

erstellt am 30. Mai 2018

Guest lecture by Thomas Solomon (University of Bergen)

This week we had our guest Thomas Solomon (University of Bergen) here at our institute talking about “Postcolonial Theory and Ethnomusicology: Ambivalence and Mimicry, from Discourse to Performance” as part of our lecture series on recent trends and new directions in ethnomusicology.

 

 

ABSTRACT: Since the turn of the millennium, ethnomusicologists have increasingly become aware of the relevance of postcolonial approaches not only for making sense of the musics that have traditionally been the field’s object of study, but also to the understanding of the history of and practice within the field itself. Concepts from postcolonial theory such as hybridity, ambiguity, mimicry, and voice have begun to provide a critical vocabulary for the study of the contradictory ways in which music is implicated in the construction of postcolonial subjectivities and histories. The recognition of the complicity of the academic field of ethnomusicology in colonial and neo-colonial regimes of knowledge-making has led to the emergence of what has been referred to as “postcolonial guilt” among contemporary academic researchers on music in decolonizing societies. The desire to decolonize research practice has led to a search for new, more collaborative methodologies and authorship practices. This presentation will provide a brief overview of some of the issues arising from a postcolonial approach to the study of music. It will also suggest some ways in which ethnomusicology can not only draw on postcolonial theory, but also potentially contribute to it.


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